Neonatal Diabetes

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Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes diagnosed in babies is quite rare. Diabetes diagnosed within the first 6 months of life is called neonatal diabetes mellitus. Neonatal diabetes may be permanent or temporary

Babies diagnosed with diabetes often have a single gene cause (monogenic). Those diagnosed before 6 months of age, they have an 80% chance of that being linked to a DNA issue. For those diagnosed from 6 months to 1 year, that percentage decreases to about 5%. It can be

They tend to be misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes before being diagnosed with monogenic diabetes. Here at the University of Chicago, we include babies diagnosed less than 1 year of age in our studies.

Diabetes is a chronic condition where the blood sugar remains high. There are many causes but typically the pancreas produces insufficient insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy.

People with monogenic diabetes may pass it on to children or future generations. Each gene has a different inheritance pattern.

The most common neonatal diabetes genes are listed below – Click on each to learn more
KCNJ11
ABCC8
INS or insulin gene
6q24 related diabetes

Some less common neonatal diabetes genes are listed below – Click on each to learn more
EIF2AK3
FOXP3
GATA6
GCK
GLIS3
HNF1B
IER3IP1
NEUROD1
NEUROG3
PDX1
PTF1A
RFX6
PAX6
SLC19A2
SLC2A2
WFS1

Questions?

Contact us at The National Center for Monogenic Diabetes at the University of Chicago Monogenic Diabetes Registry